Review excerpts

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Charles Giuliano, Berkshire Fine Arts, AVA Gallery Exhibition, NH

Most viewers will be content with the level of astute representation. Because what is seen appears to be real, the assumption is that it is simply a simulacrum. More often than not that's just not true. There is a playful sense of bait and switch as what we think we see indeed may not be. 


It is yet another signifier of post modernism in which an artist takes a traditional approach to depiction, rendering and technique but with variations that flip it on its head. 


It provocatively makes the work both immediately accessible and delightfully oblique.

David Raymond, McCoy Gallery Exhibition Catalog, MA

Certain of the more abstract paintiers of the early to mid-twentieth century associated with sur-realism like Joan Miro and Paul Klee made images that seemed to mirror our own awareness drawing us into their impossible fictions.  Morgan's images are stunning in their large scale, but are more importantly compelling for their sense of how they invite us to think them.

Charles Giuliano, Berkshire Fine Arts, Eclipse Mill Gallery Exhibition, MA

To succeed as a work of art there must be a progression both for the artist and viewers that takes us  beyond perception.       The works of Morgan evoke a growth to a new paradigm of representational painting where there is considerable thought about subject matter and rendering that is more than "retinal."

Ed Shaw, Borges Center Exhibition Catalog, Buenos Aires

Morgan is an anachronism in today's art world. He seeks the same effect as the artists who appear at the Whitney Biennials - those who accept the challenge to cross the brink and express some self-validating ultimate in a hopefully outrageous and original language. Whereas the art community's favored seek shock to score with their sense-stunned public, Morgan sticks to the tried and true.     


Each - the biennial contender and Morgan - aims at getting to us, one via overkill, the other in true-blue New England spirit, letting the viewer figure it out for himself. In today's art world, where thousands of new artists appear at the periphery of the international scene every month with aspirations of instant success, Morgan adds his own grain of sand to the growing dune. Cloaked in classical garb, the work requires a pause from zapping and deserves the effort of a second glance. For those who are willing to share his search, he takes aim at clarifying those obscure mysteries which make life so tantalizing